2 Cycling eBooks on Sale – Just 99¢ Each

6 06 2014

Beginning today, June 6th, and for a limited time, both of my cycling eBooks are on sale for just 99¢ each at the Amazon Kindle Store.

Regular Price: $2.99 Now just 99¢ each

Rediscover Your Joy with Bicycles and Cycling at the Kindle Store

Rediscover Your Joy with Bicycles and Cycling #2 at the Kindle Store

Both of these cycling eBooks are packed with valuable information that will help the beginning or returning cyclist with the choice of the right bike, how to save money when buying a bike, making sure your bike fits you, essential equipment and accessories, bike maintenance, where to ride safely, how to include the family, and so much more.

Praise from readers for “Rediscover #1″…Bicycles Cycling EBook on sale

“The Kindle is great for this information. Everything is practical; Richard Conte doesn’t talk down to beginners with lots of riding jargon and the topics make a good check list for professionals who can forget some things.

This book is about pedal bikes — the machines. The various types of popular bike use are referenced when describing different designs, but there isn’t discussion in depth about those uses — including bike touring, mountain biking, transportation biking exercise biking and everyday, joyous biking. Spinning was a new term to me.” ~ JudyAnn Lorenz, Author, Ozarks Missouri, USA

eBook Sale Price good through June 12th

High praise for “Rediscover #2″…Bicycles Cycling EBook 2 on sale

“This book is full of practical and helpful advice from the best time to purchase a bicycle and get the best deal to upgrades that will help commuters avoid punctures. I enjoyed the information about the tandem and tag-a-long bikes for families.

Highly recommended! I was glad to pick this up during the free GAW. Thanks for making it available!” ~ J. Robideau “Rob” Bhaisipati, Lalitpur, Nepal

Wow, “Rob” is a Top 1000 Reviewer at the Kindle Store, having reviewed 479 books for them, and he’s in Nepal. Gotta’ love this one! Thanks Rob.

Free Kindle Reader Apps for All Digital Devices

Did you know that you can buy and borrow Kindle books, as well as download free Kindle books, even if you don’t own a Kindle Reader? It’s true. All you have to do is download one of the many Free Kindle Reader Apps available for your PC, MAC, iPhone, iPad, Tablet, or Android device, and you will be able to read anything Amazon has to offer for a Kindle reader.

Read the rest of this entry »

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A New Year’s Ride…

5 01 2012

…well, the day after anyway.

We finally had weather that was nice enough we could haul out the road bikes on Monday, the 2nd. We only rode about 11 miles but, you know what, after 2 1/2 months of too cold, too snowy, or too wet, we loved it!

Later





With snow on the way, I figured today was a good day to ride. Even a short one is better than none.

24 10 2011

https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msa=0&msid=217899610528741699049.0004b00ec359faff0a959





Thoughts on a 4000 mile Bicycle Tour…

24 10 2011

It’s always interesting to read a piece written by someone else who seems to describe a similar experience in terms which illustrate your own. The following is just such a piece, A Man, a Bike and 4,100 Miles, by Bruce Weber of the New York Times.

In the piece, Weber writes of his 4000 mile bicycle tour across the USA this summer. He doesn’t dwell on the day-to-day challenges, nor does he dwell on the pain and doubt he experienced along the way, though it certainly gets a mention. He also does not write in overly descriptive terms of the beauty of the country, or the people he met. No, he writes from the perspective of a man of 57 years experiencing something few of us ever do; for the second time in his life.

As he comes to the close of his ride, reflects upon the internal changes which have taken place, as well as the memories of the experience which, perhaps surprisingly, are not so easy to recall. Yet, when he does recall them, they are incredibly vivid.  What I like most about this piece is the sense that no matter how many times one takes a long distance ride, and this is the second time Weber has ridden cross-country, it is a completely unique experience.

“This isn’t to say I don’t dream about crossing the George Washington Bridge with my arms raised in triumph (and then putting away my bicycle for a winter’s hibernation.) I do. But my visions aren’t terribly convincing; they generally engender despair, causing me to sigh out loud and give off a lament that begins with the words “I’ll never. … ” It makes me more than a little nervous to write this article now, about 300 miles from Manhattan. It may be easy to expect that someone who has already pedaled 3,600 miles can do 300 with his eyes closed, but I don’t think so. In order to own those miles, I have to expend my energy on them; in order to live those days, I have to work through all their hours. I’m as daunted by the next 300 miles as I was in Astoria by the first 3,600.”

This is something I too encountered on my own 800 mile trek from Phoenix to Denver. Until I arrived, I never quite believed I would make it and, even when I did, I couldn’t really grasp the fact that I had done so. Even today it sometimes amazes me that I was successful in my first-ever bicycle tour. But the memories linger, as proof that it is true.

I thoroughly enjoyed this read. So many of the things we experienced were similar, yet very different, due to the unique perspective each of us brought to the experience, I believe. It brought back many memories for me, and for that I am grateful. I think it has also begun to fuel the fire for my next long ride.

Later





Bicycle Touring Magazine…

2 10 2011

Found this in my inbox recently…

For anyone who has the lest bit of curiosity about bicycle touring, you should check out this new digital magazine, Bicycle Touring Magazine. You’ll find stories and pictures from around the world, from people who travel our planet by bike.

The images alone are dazzling, but the stories can inspire as well. While the idea of travelling third world countries by bicycle, or any other means, have never held much appeal to me personally, I can certainly appreciate the devotion of the folks who do. And, their stories are awesome.

Later





Sharing a few thoughts…

6 07 2011

I simply had to share this with everyone who reads this blog…

Monday, July 04, 2011

Declaration of Independence

When in the course of human events it becomes
necessary for a people to dissolve the bands that have connected them to utter
dependence on motorized transportation, and to assume among the users of the
road the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and Nature’s God
entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they
should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold
these truths to be self evident, that all road users are created equal and are
endowed with certain unalienable rights — that among these are Life, Liberty
and the Pursuit of Happiness. — that a human being propelling a vehicle by
muscle power shall not be subject to the whim, coercion or threat of harm from
the operator of a larger vehicle unwilling to share the public right of way. —
that citizens should not feel compelled to purchase and maintain motor vehicles
because they do not feel safe outside them. — that any citizen shall be
encouraged to enjoy the advantages economical, physical and environmental, of
transportation by bicycle.

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

Okay, the
grievances that led to the real Declaration of Independence lent themselves to
the territorial solution the Declaration laid out, and the bloody war that
followed. The Americans wanted their own turf because the British government
wasn’t meeting their needs. But I was thinking about how choosing the bicycle
sets us so firmly apart from people who, for various reasons, wouldn’t dream of
it. We’re not declaring war, but in a way we’re fighting one every day, to be
seen, respected and accommodated on the public travel ways all our taxes pay
for.

The shop actually had a party of renters cancel their reservation
while they were driving from the shop to their motel because they were scared by
the narrow roads, the traffic volume and the crash they had just witnessed in
which a motorcycle had run into the back end of a car.

At least once a
week someone tells me they think I’m crazy or stupid or braver than average
because I ride on the road. Far more frequently than that I deal with customers
selecting their bike specifically to avoid the road. Some of those customers say
they would ride the road “if they could.” Others say they are perfectly happy to
ride only on recreational paths “where they belong.”

Meeting the needs of
all road users is not easy, especially here in the land of narrow, hilly,
winding roads. That doesn’t mean it should not be done. When I’m on my bike I
slow down for motor vehicle congestion and stop for pedestrians. I don’t feel I
have the right to rip along at my best speed at all times. Nor do I accept that
I should always have to step aside or risk annihilation whenever someone else in
a vehicle of any size wants to gain a few seconds by blasting past me in a tight
spot. Nowhere is it written in traffic law that a motorist has the right (often
expressed as if it was a compulsion) to pass a slower vehicle without changing
course or reducing speed wherever the encounter should happen to take place. But
that’s common practice. Motorists do it around each other and often collide. As
cyclists we notice careless or risky behavior because we are more vulnerable to
it. We also get to hear from passing critics who might be completely muffled if
we were in a car with the windows rolled up.

I’ve had the idea a few
times to quit biking and just drive annoyingly. More effective than Critical
Mass might be for all the cyclists one day to drive, adding that many cars to
the traffic mix to show the resentful motorists what we have spared them all
these years by pedaling.

Freedom isn’t free. Most people just pay lip
service to that, sending someone else’s kids overseas to fight for our national
interests and saying nice things about them when they get back. It does not
occur to them that you can put yourself on the line for what you believe in just
by biking to the grocery store or to work. It just looks foolishly risky
compared to riding the roller coaster of oil prices, polluting the air, hating
each other in traffic, circling in search of parking, paying off car loans,
dealing with repairs and upkeep and spending all that time sitting in a confined
space.

This is from Cafiend, at one of my favorite bike blogs, “Citizen Rider.” A bike mechanic for more than 25 years, he is also an articulate writer and artist. Do yourself a favor and check out his blogs – he has half-a-dozen.
Later




Easy Riders Saturday Group Ride

25 06 2011

Just got home from the Easy Rders Group Ride. We had a tough one today. Just 4 miles in one of the kids had a “mechanical.” Mom had to turn back and take her home. Then dad developed a slow leak in a trailer tire, plus a couple of unanticipated pit stops…

Still, we made it out to Cherry Creek Res., did a spin there, and came back. We… did a total of 12.2 miles at a surprising 9.8 mph.

All the kids have geared bikes now, so they did really well and, in spite of some problems, we had a good time.

Later







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